CSS3 Transforms & @font-face Experiment

This is the first of what I hope are number of experiments I plan on working on over the next few months, all in an effort to get acquainted with some of the new CSS3 features out in the wild that seem to be gaining some traction…

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CSS3 Transition-Delay

In another round of CSS3 experimentation, I wanted to see if it was possible to sequentially transition the opacity of 3 or more elements via CSS without having them all begin fading at once. While it seems painfully obvious now, I wasn’t aware that the transition-delay property existed. It’s currently compatible with webkit browsers like Safari or Google Chrome…

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CSS3 In Transition

With the addition of the CSS3 transition property comes a lot of uncharted territory. Never before has it been so easy to bring animation into a usable, standards-based browsing environment. Determining how often and to what degree one should use animation on a web build can be tricky. As we evaluate how to implement animations from project to project, we’ll need to carefully consider how it might affect user experience. Here are a few observations I’ve made from the field…

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Curtis CSS Typeface

Curtis is the name I’ve given for a family of geometric sans-serif fonts currently in development. Other incarnations exist as Fontstructions: Curtis Heavy and Curtis Pixel 14. This version takes form in CSS. All shapes are rendered by the browser, using a combination of background color, border width, border radius, and a heavily reliance on absolute/relative positioning…

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Setting Rather than Resetting Default Styling

Following the idea of “tweaking” a reset file, I came up with this “base styles sheet”. It sets default styling for many elements, follows a couple of recommendations regarding usability/accessibility, and addresses a few “common issues” as well…

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The Future Of CSS Typography

There has been an increasing and sincere interest in typography on the web over the last few years. Most websites rely on text to convey their messages, so it’s not a surprise that text is treated with utmost care. In this article, we’ll look at some useful techniques and clever effects that use the power of style sheets and some features of the upcoming CSS Text Level 3 specification, which should give Web designers finer control over text…

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Why You Should Deeply Nest Your CSS Selectors

Most developers, even experienced developers, don’t understand the value of deeply nesting CSS selectors. Although writing the same selectors over and over might seem redundant, it’s worth the extra effort. Your code will be better organized, easier to read, and more maintainable…

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The Demise of CSS: Why Sass and Languages Like it Will Triumph

Sass is essentially a programming language for designers. It is extremely limited when compared with other languages, but it does a magnificent job of translating the core concepts of a programming language in a way that makes sense for styling a document…

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