CSS3 Border-Radius & Rounded Avatars

Originally when I CSSed the round avatars on the DesignSwap comments area, I used the -webkit-mask-image property. I was really proud of how neat and effective this was until I realized you could apply border-radius to an image directly. To achieve a round avatar with a 2px beige border, I applied the following CSS to an avatar loading within a div class called avatar-frame…

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Start Experimenting With CSS3 Keyframe Animations

CSS3 animations are the new kid on the block. It’s a big step. Although they haven’t really taken centre stage yet as only the webkit browsers support them.

For this reason they’re used sparingly, in a lot of cases for experimental purposes or as ‘hidden gems’, but that doesn’t mean you should shy away from getting stuck in…

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Word-Wrap: A CSS3 Property That Works in Every Browser

Okay, this is not exactly the kind of CSS property that’s going to be used in every design. But it is a very useful one when you need it, and some might say it’s much more practical than some of the fluffy new CSS3 features like transitions and whatnot.The property I’m talking about is the CSS3 word-wrap property, and believe it or not, it works in every single browser, including all versions of IE. In fact, it was even supported as far back as IE5…

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Understanding CSS3 border-image

The new CSS3 property border-image is a little tricky, but it can allow you to create flexible boxes with custom borders (or drop shadows, if that’s your thing) with a single div and a single image. In this article I explain how the border-image shorthand property works in today’s browsers…

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Pure CSS collapsible tree menu

The classic tree view, we all know it, it’s used everywhere and it definitely can be useful in the right context. I’ve seen various examples about doing it with CSS and they’ve all required JavaScript. Not content with any of those solutions I investigated doing it with pure CSS, I got a good head start from my Custom Radio and Checkbox inputs article. From there I’ve come up with a solution that works pretty well…

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Font metrics and vertical space in CSS

We put a lot of effort into the quality of the fonts in the Typekit library. As part of that work, we’ve been researching the relationship between font math and CSS, and would like to share what we’ve found. If you’ve ever wondered why some fonts look smaller than others at the same typeset size, or why the vertical space between lines of text is such a guessing game, this post is for you…

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CSS Webkit Appearance

I did my fair share of testing this site on an iPad during development. In most cases, the version of Mobile Safari found on the iPad renders pages like any other standards-based browser. Only when I got to native UI elements like search boxes & text fields did I notice an inconsistency. A pre-set styling was being applied in the way of an inner shadow to text input fields and a gradient overlay to search / submit buttons, which also got rounded corners. After picking through Safari’s CSS Reference I found -webkit-appearance, which changes the appearance of buttons & controls to resemble a native apple UI…

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