Using CSS3 Transitions, Transforms and Animation

First things first – these demos are showing of CSS transitions, transforms 2D and 3D and animations. Currently May 2010, transitions and 2D transforms are available in all current browsers at least in a dev build apart from Internet Explorer, 3D transforms and animations are only in Safari. Most examples degrade nicely, so if you are using a legacy browser you can still use a site using these, you just won’t get animation. 3D transforms generally don’t degrade nicely, so be careful when using them…

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The New Lens Flare – CSS3

By abusing the text-shadow property, you can turn any ho-hum bit of text into a magnificent, radiant beacon of allure and awe. But getting your bling-bling on has never been for the cheapskates. Expect to pay a boatload in refresh rates, as your browser buckles under the weight of rendering that glorious halo…

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Random Color CSS3 Animation

Ever since I wrote my first lines of code, I have had a strange interest in the functions that generate random numbers. and yes, I know actual random doesn’t exist Every time I just want to fool around with some code, you will find me popping in a random function in somewhere. So when I started playing around with CSS3 Animations the urge to use more random was always lurking around many a corner. I ended up writing a 50 frame CSS3 Animation that just looped through a bunch of random colors…

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SuperStretch! – A Vertically Fluid Layout Using CSS

Here’s a technique I created a while back that I have revisited and tidied up a bit. It results in a layout that stretches both horizontally and vertically to the browser viewport. It includes a vertical navigation bar where button heights also stretch. It works in FF, Safari, Chrome, Opera, and IE 6-8…

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Raindrop Logo in CSS

Playing around with -moz-radial-gradient this past while, and seeing the amazing job done on the CSS Opera logo by David Desandro, I thought I’d have a go at recreating one of the logos I illustrated within the past year using pure CSS.

The Raindrop logo I created was the prime candidate, as my first thoughts were “hey, three of the corners are basically -moz-border-radius set to 100%!” Done. Next was to figure out how to construct it…

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-webkit-font-smoothing

I’m not a big fan of the default text rendering in WebKit, in my opinion, it’s too heavy. There used to be a workaround where setting text-shadow would make the text thinner, but updating to Snow Leopard rendered that useless. Then someone found another hack using -webkit-text-stroke that seemed to work nicely, but it wasn’t usable on text-heavy pages, causing performance issues when scrolling. So you can imagine how happy I was when I saw Faruk Ateş tweeting something about -webkit-font-smoothing. Being the CSS geek I am, I whipped up a demo page you need the latest WebKit Nightly to properly see that page to see what exactly it did…

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Create Beautiful CSS3 Typography

It has been suggested that beautiful and usable websites are created on a foundation of beautiful and usable typography. I’ve even read an article that suggests that the web is actually comprised of 95% typography. I’m not convinced that there is any empirical evidence for this figure, but I think that the point is a good one. And, that makes typography a pretty important element that you will want to look at very carefully…

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