CSS text-indent: An Excellent Trick To Style Your HTML Form

You probably know what the text-indent property does in CSS. It’s a common CSS property allowing webmasters to indent paragraphs and hide text for image-based links. Text-indent does this great; however, it doesn’t just hide and indent text. It does more.

People mostly use text-indent to hide text like our example above. They often use the negative value for text-indent but forget to make use of its original intent: inset indentation. Here I’ll show you how to make a beautiful text field using text-indent…

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Pure CSS Speech Bubbles

Speech bubbles are a popular effect but many tutorials rely on presentational HTML or JavaScript. This tutorial contains various forms of speech bubble effect created with CSS2.1 and enhanced with CSS3. No images, no JavaScript and it can be applied to your existing semantic HTML…

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The Basics of CSS3

Last week I posted a CSS3 dropdown menu and someone complained that I didn’t explain the CSS code in detail. Well, here is a post on the basics of the new properties: text-shadow, box-shadow, and border-radius. These CSS3 properties are commonly used to enhance layout and good to know…

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Speed Up with CSS3 Gradients

WebKit browsers paved the way with CSS based gradients. Now Firefox 3.6 is out and is supporting them as well, which makes using them for progressive enhancement all the more appealing. More good news, CSS3 gradients fall into the camp where you can specify fallbacks (i.e. images) so that browsers that don’t support them just use the image instead.

But wait… if you need to use an image anyway, why bother with declaring the gradient with CSS? That is kind of how I felt for a long time, but there is one important aspect that makes it worth it: browsers that support them don’t load the image fallback. One less HTTP Request = all the faster your site will load…

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How to create drop caps with CSS and CSS3

Drop caps are a nice typographic detail that look great on many websites. There are a few ways of achieving this effect but the CSS selector I like to use is the :first-letter pseudo-element. This selector is reasonably well supported across most modern browsers albeit with a few minor bugs here and there. Here’s how it works…

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The Future Of CSS Typography

There has been an increasing and sincere interest in typography on the web over the last few years. Most websites rely on text to convey their messages, so it’s not a surprise that text is treated with utmost care. In this article, we’ll look at some useful techniques and clever effects that use the power of style sheets and some features of the upcoming CSS Text Level 3 specification, which should give Web designers finer control over text…

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CSS3 Dropdown Menu

A Mac-like multi-level dropdown menu that I’ve created using border-radius, box-shadow, and text-shadow. It renders perfect on Firefox, Safari and Chrome. The dropdown also works on non-CSS3 compitable browsers such as IE7+, but the rounded corners and shadow will not be rendered…

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