Fluid Images in CSS Fluid Layouts

One of the really solid criticisms lobbied against my Fluid Grids article for ALA was that all of my examples were pretty text-heavy. As a result, they all more or less ignored the issue I raised at the end of the essay: that working with non-fixed layouts can be more difficult once you introduce fixed-width elements into them. By default, an image element that’s sized at, say, 500px doesn’t exactly play nicely with an container that can be as large as 800px, but as small as 100px. What’s a designer to do?

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CSS Differences in Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8

This article will attempt to provide an exhaustive, easy-to-use reference for developers desiring to know the differences in CSS support for IE6, IE7 and IE8. This reference contains brief descriptions and compatibility for:

  • Any item that is supported by one of the three browser versions, but not the other two
  • Any item that is supported by two of the three browser versions, but not the other one
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How to: CSS Large Background

Since I posted the huge collection of Large Background Websites, I received several email requests on how to make a large background site with CSS. So, I thought it would be a good idea to share my techniques on designing large background websites. In this tutorial, I will provide various CSS examples on how you can create a large background site using either a single or double images…

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Easily Turn Your Images Into Polaroids with CSS3

Yesterday, Jon and I were going back and forth about what to blog about next. Love of CSS and doing something cool with it is kind of our thing and we quickly jumped on a brand new idea: polaroid style images with just CSS. Holy super awesome, Batman!

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How to Create Simple and Effective Sub Navs with Definition Lists

When we need simple and effective on-page navigation, to either jump to content on the page or flip to another view, we use the dl element. Its sub elements, the dt and dd, make it very easy for us to create inline links with a clear label. Here we’re going to share with you a fast, lightweight method for how we’ll use CSS to do it…

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Really Simple CSS Trick for Equal Height Columns

This tutorial describes a really simple CSS trick to implement a fake equal height columns effect using the CSS properties position:absolute and border. Before to proceed I suggest you to download my CSS 2 Visual Cheat Sheet for a practical reference guide to CSS 2 properties that can help you understand concepts illustrated in this post…

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xCSS – OO CSS Framework

xCSS bases on CSS and empowers a straightforward and object-oriented workflow when developing complex style cascades. Using xCSS means a dramatic cut down to your development time by: having a intuitive overview of the overall CSS structure, using variables, re-using existing style cascades and many other handy features. But, most frameworks are bulky and inflexible, aren’t they? Not xCSS! It’s lightweight and seamlessly integrates into any existing workflow. Aside from that the CSS overhead is getting reduced while your XHTML attributes remain semantic…

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How to distribute elements horizontally using CSS

In this post I want to reply to a frequently asked question that I receive from my readers about how to distribute horizontally a certain number of elements within a main container using CSS. This problem is not particularly complex and can be solved simply using the CSS selector :first-child…

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Becoming a Font Embedding Master

I’ve spent a couple days worth now trying to figure out the best and most complete approach to font embedding using @font-face. It really is a dark art that must be mastered. It is by no means a straightforward process. Here’s the findings…

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Methodic Approach to CSS Coding

Which approach is better to write CSS code? In general I always prefer to use a methodic top-down approach I want to present you in this post. I called this process Four Bubbles Model.The model is based on four progressive phases that helps you quickly develop CSS files and maintain a better control of code you’re writing. The following picture illustrates the four main phases that compose the model…

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