Pure CSS opacity and how to have opaque children

Opacity is a desirable thing in this day and age; especially with the design trends that typified the web2.0 movement. Here are two different methods of achieving CSS opacity. One where the children inherit the opacity, the other where content can have its own opacity level…

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Four Sided PNG Drop Shadows with CSS

In the PNG Drop Shadows article we explored a new CSS method that uses the PNG image format to apply drop shadows to any arbitrary box, producing excellent looking shadows. That’s great, but the method limits us to having shadows on just two sides of the content box. Clients aren’t going to be satisfied with that stricture for very long, so we need to pump up our shadows to cover all four sides of the box, just in case…

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CSS – Imageless Rounded Corners

Over the past few years, many web designers have decided rounded-corners improve the layout/usability of their sites. Typically, two techniques are used: using background images with layered elements or simulating rounded corners with elements inserted via JavaScript. Both techniques have a drawback, requiring extra load time for images to download or for JavaScript to execute. It would be nice if browsers had built in CSS support handling the rounding of corners. Fortunately, CSS3 will include a “border-radius” rule to specify how to handle corner rounding. Although no browsers fully support CSS3 yet, there are browser specific rules implementing the CSS3 rounded corners…

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Advanced CSS Printing Using CSS Page Breaks

Here’s an article explaining how to make your pages printer-friendly by using CSS/XHTML page breaks.

There are numerous spots that are good for page breaks:

  • Between page sections (h2 or h3 tags, depending on your site format)
  • Between the end of an article and subsequent comments / trackbacks
  • Between longs blocks of content

Using page breaks in CSS is simple…

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CSS Pull Quotes

Pull quotes are commonly used in print publications to draw emphasis to a particular quote or excerpt from a document, typically placing it in a larger typeface nearby on the page. When creating a well formed HTML document, pullquotes introduce a challenge in that they require a passage of text to be repeated on the page. This has the potential to introduce confusion when the document is read without the accompanying style sheet. Ideally then, a pullquote should be considered a stylistic element and as such should be seperated from the document itself and rendered with a stylesheet.

Since techniques to hide portions of a webpage rely on using CSS or JavaScript, we’ll need to approach this problem from the other direction – in this case using CSS to display new content. In this tutorial we’ll place the pullquote text in the title attribute of a paragraph or page division, and use the :before pseudo element’s ability to generate content to display the pullquote on the page…

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CSS3 – a big storm is coming

A big storm is coming, and it hopefully will blow away a lot of things that are wrong with web design. While the current CSS standard offered tremendous steps away from traditional print design, with CSS3 media queries and multi-column layouts it will be a whole new ballgame. The possibilies we have now hopefully change the way we approach website design like few things we’ve seen up until now…

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Taming Long Words with CSS word-wrap

Web browsers have a long history of sharing features between them. The word-wrap CSS property is a feature that originally came from Microsoft and is included in CSS3.

Now available in Firefox 3.5, this CSS property allows the browser to arbitrarily break up long words or strings of characters to fit within a given element…

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