CSS Specific for Internet Explorer

As much as we don’t like to deal with the IE bugs, we still have to face it because your boss and visitors are still using Explorer. It gets frustrating when different versions of Explorer displays web pages differently due to the inconsistent rendering engine. We typically use IE conditional comments to fix the IE issues. But there are more ways than the conditional comments…

Ultimate CSS Gradient Generator

The Ultimate CSS Gradient Editor has the ability to specify gradients using pure CSS3, without having to create any images and use them as repeating backgrounds for gradient effects. The resulting CSS gradients are cross-browser – they will work in these browsers and will also fall back to a simpler gradient in Internet Explorer…

CSS3 support in Internet Explorer 6, 7, and 8

IE-CSS3 is a script to provide Internet Explorer support for several of the popular new styles available in the upcoming CSS3 standard. How it works, if you view the page in Internet Explorer, some of the elements will be rebuilt by the script in Vector Markup Language VML, an IE-specific vector drawing language. VML supports things that are missing from IE’s CSS implementation like rounded corners and blur effects…

CSS Rounded Corners In All Browsers With No Images

In this article we’ll walk through getting rounded corners working in all browsers. Firefox, Safari and Chrome are easy with the border-radius property, but we’ll have to jump through some extra hoops to get it working in IE and Opera.

After only a few compromises, we will have CSS rounded corners working in all browsers, and without using any images…

IE Background RGB Bug

Using RGBa for progressive enhancement is getting more and more popular, which is awesome. Even nearly a year ago it was pretty much ready to rock. A great way to handle the progressive enhancement part is just to declare a fallback color before the RGBa value, so older browsers that don’t support it will get a solid color version…

Extending CSS with jQuery

Before we leap in, let’s take a look at why jQuery has come to be the most widely adopted of JavaScript frameworks. First, it’s extremely designer friendly. You’ll see some standard CSS mark-up – hover conditions, list elements – defining styles is very much a static process, but jQuery allows you to easily and instantly add or remove classes, conditions, functions and more to any element on your page so that it takes CSS to the next level – interactivity. jQuery also has a very short learning curve which as some of us know has meant that creating effects like boxes sliding up or down a page child’s play…

CSS Performance: UI with Fewer Images

Often performance improvements come with their drawbacks, sometimes improving performance causes pains in other parts of the development process or strips stuff from the final product. Sometimes there’s even a conflict where you have to pick: slow, unusable and beautiful or fast and looking like hacked with a blunt axe. But it doesn’t have to be this way. This post outlines some approaches to achieving common UI elements using CSS tricks in as many browsers as possible while using as fewer images as possible. Some of the tricks are brand new, some are very, very old. They all have in common the “fewer or no images” mantra. Using fewer images comes with some pronounced benefits…