39 Ridiculous Things To Do With CSS3 Box Shadows

Box-shadow is a pretty powerful property in modern browsers. With just six little values, you can make some really neat stuff. How much neat stuff, you ask? To find out, I set a little time aside each day to play with it. The result is 39 ridiculous little experiments that, due to whatever issues, can only be viewed in Chrome 11 or better…

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How To Create Depth And Nice 3D Ribbons Only Using CSS3

Yes, it’s possible to create a simple and nice 3D layout playing with some CSS3 stuff, only using code and without the help of Photoshop. We want to make 3D elements without images. There are some properties of the CSS3 languages that can help us to accomplish this mission. We will use box-shadow to create a drop-shadow with RGBa, a color model that allows an optimized contrast with any kind of backgrounds…

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Shadows and CSS3

I’m currently working on a design that uses text-shadow and box-shadow, with RGBA in place to create the shadow color. I wanted to tweet about this technique because it’s simple and awesome, but to my surprise I couldn’t find a good, quick tutorial that covered the use of both text and box-shadow, along with RGBA. So I decided to create one…

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Cross-browser Drop Shadows Using Pure CSS

There’s an awful lot of noise at the moment regarding dropping IE6 and forging ahead with CSS3 properties for the finer touches on web layouts. One such example is adding drop shadows to content blocks. There are countless ways of achieving this, most requiring additional HTML markup and one or more PNG images. Not to mention hacks for IE6 to get render PNGs properly.

CSS3 provides the box-shadow property to achieve just that. Thankfully Safari/Webkit has supported this for some time, and Firefox more recently with Firefox 3.5. Internet Explorer provides a DropShadow filter but this provides a hard-edged shadow unlike its CSS3 counterpart. By combining the Glow and Shadow filters however, we can achieve something that fairly closely resembles the rendered CSS3 shadow…

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Cross-browser drop shadows using pure CSS

There’s an awful lot of noise at the moment regarding dropping IE6 and forging ahead with CSS3 properties for the finer touches on web layouts. Do websites need to look exactly the same in every browser?

One such example is adding drop shadows to content blocks. There are countless ways of achieving this, most requiring additional HTML markup and one or more PNG images. Not to mention hacks for IE6 to get render PNGs properly. All of this begins to degrade page performance, when really the drop shadow is merely a secondary design flourish. CSS3 provides the box-shadow property to achieve just that. Thankfully Safari/Webkit has supported this for some time, and Firefox more recently with Firefox 3.5. Internet Explorer provides a DropShadow filter but this provides a hard-edged shadow unlike its CSS3 counterpart. By combining the Glow and Shadow filters however, we can achieve something that fairly closely resembles the rendered CSS3 shadow…

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CSS text-shadow Fun: Realtime Lighting Demo

A post about the CSS text-shadow property. It’s been used to create some fun pseudo-realtime lighting effects.

There’s an example using a PNG to create a spotlight with some JavaScript to update the text-shadow style in order to simulate realtime shadows from a single light source. Works in Firefox 3.5, Safari, Opera, and Chrome but no support in IE8…

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