Setting Rather than Resetting Default Styling

Following the idea of “tweaking” a reset file, I came up with this “base styles sheet”. It sets default styling for many elements, follows a couple of recommendations regarding usability/accessibility, and addresses a few “common issues” as well…

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10 Tips for Better Print Style Sheets

Print style sheets have been somewhat forgotten, and yet they remain important all the same. Many people print out articles to read while traveling or when they have no access to the Internet.

Print style sheets have definite benefits. For example, reading on paper is less tiring on the eyes than reading on screen.

Also, following tutorials is easier if you have one next to you, with your code editor open on the screen; that way, you don’t have to switch windows every time to look something up.

In this article we’ll point out 10 easy tips that will help you create better print style sheets.

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To CSS Reset or Not to CSS Reset

Question: Which Global Reset for CSS Should I Use? The short answer is the simplest one possible. The slightly longer answer is that you should reset some styles, but do so with a good reason. The long answer is that the exact CSS reset you choose will depend on the needs of your design…

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Why Stylesheet Abstraction Matters

I’ve seen a number of comments on blogs and twitter that amount to “You don’t need a new stylesheet syntax, CSS is simple and you’re a moron if you can’t do it.” I agree, CSS is simple. You assign style primitives to elements and some of those primitives cascade down to the elements contained within. I get it. It’s simple to understand. But CSS is not simple to use or maintain. It’s time for stylesheets to evolve so that we can take web design to the next level…

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Object Oriented CSS

Object oriented CSS OOC is one of the new buzz words in the industry. A lot of work is being done by Nicole Sullivan. I kind of like the idea myself and have been doing some forrays into it myself. I think that it will stop hap-hazard CSS coding. I find this happens quite a lot, you get lazy and just add a little bit of code to the bottom of your stylesheet. Worse you add an inline style. The idea behind OOC is that you seperate the structure from the skin and the container from the content. Basically this means that CSS developers write their code with extensibility in mind. So that one can make changes without un-necessarily rewriting or duplicating previous code…

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The 5-Minute CSS Mobile Makeover

More people are surfing the Web via mobile device than ever before. It’s just so convenient to have that mobile access to anything you need. Sadly, most websites have not yet considered their mobile visitors, who probably move on to the next site before trying to make sense of a jumbled mess. Those of you who surf the Mobile Web know exactly what I’m talking about here: sites that “get it” are a joy to visit, but those that don’t are a total pain. What’s to get? Well, for one, if you do nothing else for your mobile visitors, take five minutes and implement a basic stylesheet to make your site readable via mobile device. This tutorial will show you how to retain visitors and reduce bounce rate with a super-easy 5-minute mobile makeover…

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HTML 5 Reset Stylesheet

We’ve had a number of people asking about templates, boilerplates and styling for HTML 5 so to give you all a helping hand and continue on from those basic building blocks that Remy talked about last week, here’s a HTML 5 reset stylesheet for you to take away and use, edit, amend and update in your projects. It’s based on Eric Meyers CSS reset, with a few adjustments from Erics work that we’ll get to later but first here’s the file in full and we’ll then break it down step by step…

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